Bill banning ‘no-knock’ raids in Virginia sent to Gov. Northam

The bill also would require search warrants to be served during the daytime

Virginia’s General Assembly passed a bill banning “no-knock” search warrants Wednesday, clearing the way for it to go to Gov. Ralph Northam’s desk.

“I applaud my colleagues in the General Assembly for supporting HB 5099,” Virginia Delegate Lashrecse Aird, who introduced the bill, said in a statement. “This bill was drafted with significant input from stakeholders from both law enforcement and the criminal justice community, working together towards the goal of protecting more lives in the Commonwealth.”

The bill passed the House of Delegates last month.

The legislation, in part, is a response to the death of Breonna Taylor in Kentucky earlier this year. She was killed at home after officers entered to serve a no-knock drug warrant connected with a suspect who did not live there and was already in police custody.

In this Jan. 8, photo, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam delivers his State of the Commonwealth address as House Speaker Eileen Filler-Corn, D-Fairfax, right, and Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax, left, listen before a joint session of the Virginia Assembly at the state Capitol in Richmond, Va.  (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

In this Jan. 8, photo, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam delivers his State of the Commonwealth address as House Speaker Eileen Filler-Corn, D-Fairfax, right, and Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax, left, listen before a joint session of the Virginia Assembly at the state Capitol in Richmond, Va.  (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

VIRGINIA GOV. RALPH NORTHAM AND WIFE TEST POSITIVE FOR CORONAVIRUS

The officers entered the apartment and were met with gunfire from Kenneth Walker, Taylor’s boyfriend. His defense attorney said in court filings that Walker pulled the trigger in self-defense because he thought the men were trying to break in. Authorities claim the officers identified themselves first, which is in dispute, but charges against Walker were dropped.

The bill would ban law enforcement officers from seeking or executing no-knock searches and would make any evidence obtained by them inadmissible as evidence. It also requires search warrants to be served during the daytime, except "for good cause" or in cases involving the "withdrawal of blood."

This undated photo provided by Taylor family attorney Sam Aguiar shows Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Ky.  (Courtesy of Taylor Family attorney Sam Aguiar via AP, File)

This undated photo provided by Taylor family attorney Sam Aguiar shows Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Ky.  (Courtesy of Taylor Family attorney Sam Aguiar via AP, File)

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“Forced entry raids and the use of no-knock search warrants have long terrorized Black and brown communities, causing trauma and tragedy in some instances,” Aird said. “The fight against this tactic was revived as a result of the tragic loss of Breonna Taylor, and with this legislation, the power of her life remains undeniable and will be felt forever.”

The bill now moves on to Northam’s desk, where it it is expected to become law with his signature. His office did not immediately respond to a Fox News request for comment.

https://www.revenuenetworkcpm.com/suxp85rw?key=53d3779b7a34905bb0164bc138cf9e3e